Canada highlights progress settling Agricultural Benefits Claims with Treaty 8 First Nations

OTTAWA, July 3, 2018 /CNW/ – The Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs, Carolyn Bennett, issued the following statement today:

“I was truly honoured to take part today in a special gathering with Treaty #8 First Nation Chiefs and community members to celebrate recent progress we have made together to find shared solutions that resolve longstanding specific claims.

This past year, the Government of Canada and eighteen First Nations in Treaty #8 have successfully concluded negotiated settlements to resolve their agricultural benefits claims.

Achieved through partnership and dialogue, these settlements included financial compensation for past damages relating to broken treaty promises for agricultural benefits under Treaty #8. These jointly developed agreements were approved by First Nation members in community votes over the course of the past year.

This is a decisive step forward to renew our relationship with and advance reconciliation with the following First Nations: Athabasca Chipewyan; Black Lake; Blueberry River; Doig River; Duncan’s; Fond du Lac; Fort McMurray; Fort Nelson; Halfway River; K’atlodeeche; Mikisew Cree; Prophet River; Saulteau; Sturgeon Lake Cree; Swan River; Tallcree; West Moberly; and Whitefish Lake.

Our joint work is continuing at other specific claim negotiating tables across the country and we look forward to advancing these talks with our First Nation partners toward a successful conclusion.

Settling claims is the right thing to do. Negotiated settlements help right past wrongs, honour treaty obligations and advance reconciliation with First Nations for the benefit of all Canadians.

Settling claims is one of many steps on the journey of reconciliation with First Nations and helps create a better future for everyone.”

3 Comments on "Canada highlights progress settling Agricultural Benefits Claims with Treaty 8 First Nations"

  1. Frustrated treaty Indian(s) | July 17, 2018 at 10:01 pm | Reply

    Whitefish Lake 459 which was represented by the former chief and Acroyd Law Firm [at the time of the vote] only gave Whitefish Lake treaty Indians $4,000 each and you had to be registered to the band. If you weren’t a registered band member to the reserve you weren’t allowed to attend meetings concerning this cow and plough money. Also Gary Laboucane of Whitefish who was also with Acroyd took $3,000,000 for himself as a “Lawyer’s fee”. A week after things were signed by obligatory terms for a yes vote under a contract which was written up by Acroyd pretty much forced the members of the band to vote yes to $4,000 or we “weren’t getting anything at all”. So, here I sit as a treaty Indian from Whitefish Lake 459 with no cow and plough all because I’m “Not registered to the band as a ‘band member'”. Hopefully under the new chief though things will be corrected and each member whether registered to the band or not will get the money ($38,000) that’s rightfully owed to them.

    Signed, a very frustrated treaty Indian.

  2. Hi I’m from treaty 8 and this type of bullying cash cow issues needs to stop !
    Indigenous people are not pawns toward someone’s greed and financial misappropriation of our rightful treaty withheld funds for future generations or scare tactics that future funds may not be available under our ongoing broken treaties
    We the treaty people can no longer be fooled, as our money is sitting in reserve in Ottawa while people on reserve with water & housing issues like in 3rd world countries
    I have spoken on behalf of the ancestral signing of treaty 8

  3. Priscella -Greyeyes | August 26, 2019 at 1:05 am | Reply

    contact me , i am from wflfn 459 .

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